A Blog Of Constant Sorrow

theyoungdoyley:

the merc and android 0-425

A mercenary is given the task of breaking a dysfunctional, violent android out of a laboratory before it can be dissected for analysis. 

Android 0-425 was found at the scene of the crime, holding the murder weapon - a piece of rebar. Skin was missing from the android’s neck, shoulders, and legs.

While impalement was the cause of death, the victim’s face was also mutilated until rendered unrecognizable. Blood was found on the android’s hands. 

As all androids are three-laws compliant, investigation is underway. 

I had a craving for 80s grunge sci-fi BL, what can I say.

IT MADE ME TEARBEND TOO

Gogglesque don’t look at the tags

Wow this season of Korra was a monumental goddamn improvement

astolat:

limnetic:

Expo, an Iron Man fanvid by lim
Music: Turn Up The Faders by Nathan Asher & The Infantry
Thanks to Cesperanza and Astolat

HD download will be available on /lim shortly.

Do yourself a favor and watch this vid instantly, because HOLY CRAP, from the first moment I saw a section I was all, OK, so Marvel was just a warm-up? This vid blows me away so hard. I have rarely seen any vid that so effectively does first person POV, that really puts you inside a character’s head like this one does. It’s such a cool experience, whether you’re a fan of Tony or not. 

vmsterdvm:

Daniel & Willy

vmsterdvm:

Daniel & Willy

hexurbanity:

A pair of models leaving a hotel lobby on their way to a photoshoot during the 1992 Which Witch? fashion show in Paris
This candid gained great publicity in magical society throughout all of Europe; quickly becoming one of the most famous pictures of the decade, and a globally recognized icon of french fashion.
(Yves St. Laurent)

hexurbanity:

A pair of models leaving a hotel lobby on their way to a photoshoot during the 1992 Which Witch? fashion show in Paris

This candid gained great publicity in magical society throughout all of Europe; quickly becoming one of the most famous pictures of the decade, and a globally recognized icon of french fashion.

(Yves St. Laurent)

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

So anyway, I was having this argument with my father about Martin Luther King and how his message was too conservative compared to Malcolm X’s message. My father got really angry at me. It wasn’t that he disliked Malcolm X, but his point was that Malcolm X hadn’t accomplished anything as Dr. King had.

I was kind of sarcastic and asked something like, so what did Martin Luther King accomplish other than giving his “I have a dream speech.”

Before I tell you what my father told me, I want to digress. Because at this point in our amnesiac national existence, my question pretty much reflects the national civic religion view of what Dr. King accomplished. He gave this great speech. Or some people say, “he marched.” I was so angry at Mrs. Clinton during the primaries when she said that Dr. King marched, but it was LBJ who delivered the Civil Rights Act.

At this point, I would like to remind everyone exactly what Martin Luther King did, and it wasn’t that he “marched” or gave a great speech.

My father told me with a sort of cold fury, “Dr. King ended the terror of living in the south.”

Please let this sink in and and take my word and the word of my late father on this. If you are a white person who has always lived in the U.S. and never under a brutal dictatorship, you probably don’t know what my father was talking about.

But this is what the great Dr. Martin Luther King accomplished. Not that he marched, nor that he gave speeches.

He ended the terror of living as a black person, especially in the south.

I’m guessing that most of you, especially those having come fresh from seeing The Help, may not understand what this was all about. But living in the south (and in parts of the midwest and in many ghettos of the north) was living under terrorism.

It wasn’t that black people had to use a separate drinking fountain or couldn’t sit at lunch counters, or had to sit in the back of the bus.

You really must disabuse yourself of this idea. Lunch counters and buses were crucial symbolic planes of struggle that the civil rights movement used to dramatize the issue, but the main suffering in the south did not come from our inability to drink from the same fountain, ride in the front of the bus or eat lunch at Woolworth’s.

It was that white people, mostly white men, occasionally went berserk, and grabbed random black people, usually men, and lynched them. You all know about lynching. But you may forget or not know that white people also randomly beat black people, and the black people could not fight back, for fear of even worse punishment.

This constant low level dread of atavistic violence is what kept the system running. It made life miserable, stressful and terrifying for black people.

White people also occasionally tried black people, especially black men, for crimes for which they could not conceivably be guilty. With the willing participation of white women, they often accused black men of “assault,” which could be anything from rape to not taking off one’s hat, to “reckless eyeballing.”

This is going to sound awful and perhaps a stain on my late father’s memory, but when I was little, before the civil rights movement, my father taught me many, many humiliating practices in order to prevent the random, terroristic, berserk behavior of white people. The one I remember most is that when walking down the street in New York City side by side, hand in hand with my hero-father, if a white woman approached on the same sidewalk, I was to take off my hat and walk behind my father, because he had been taught in the south that black males for some reason were supposed to walk single file in the presence of any white lady.

This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

I remember a huge family reunion one August with my aunts and uncles and cousins gathered around my grandparents’ vast breakfast table laden with food from the farm, and the state troopers drove up to the house with a car full of rifles and shotguns, and everyone went kind of weirdly blank. They put on the masks that black people used back then to not provoke white berserkness. My strong, valiant, self-educated, articulate uncles, whom I adored, became shuffling, Step-N-Fetchits to avoid provoking the white men. Fortunately the troopers were only looking for an escaped convict. Afterward, the women, my aunts, were furious at the humiliating performance of the men, and said so, something that even a child could understand.

This is the climate of fear that Dr. King ended.

If you didn’t get taught such things, let alone experience them, I caution you against invoking the memory of Dr. King as though he belongs exclusively to you and not primarily to African Americans.

The question is, how did Dr. King do this—and of course, he didn’t do it alone.

(Of all the other civil rights leaders who helped Dr. King end this reign of terror, I think the most under appreciated is James Farmer, who founded the Congress of Racial Equality and was a leader of nonviolent resistance, and taught the practices of nonviolent resistance.)

So what did they do?

They told us: Whatever you are most afraid of doing vis-a-vis white people, go do it. Go ahead down to city hall and try to register to vote, even if they say no, even if they take your name down.

Go ahead sit at that lunch counter. Sue the local school board. All things that most black people would have said back then, without exaggeration, were stark raving insane and would get you killed.

If we do it all together, we’ll be okay.

They made black people experience the worst of the worst, collectively, that white people could dish out, and discover that it wasn’t that bad. They taught black people how to take a beating—from the southern cops, from police dogs, from fire department hoses. They actually coached young people how to crouch, cover their heads with their arms and take the beating. They taught people how to go to jail, which terrified most decent people.

And you know what? The worst of the worst, wasn’t that bad.

Once people had been beaten, had dogs sicced on them, had fire hoses sprayed on them, and been thrown in jail, you know what happened?

These magnificent young black people began singing freedom songs in jail.

That, my friends, is what ended the terrorism of the south. Confronting your worst fears, living through it, and breaking out in a deep throated freedom song. The jailers knew they had lost when they beat the crap out of these young Negroes and the jailed, beaten young people began to sing joyously, first in one town then in another. This is what the writer, James Baldwin, captured like no other writer of the era.

Please let this sink in. It wasn’t marches or speeches. It was taking a severe beating, surviving and realizing that our fears were mostly illusory and that we were free.

"I also had pleasant day. I went working and shopping," Helena says to an imaginary companion across the table, midway through season one of BBC America’s Orphan Black. She’s alone in the kitchen eating contraband chicken. The effect is blisteringly funny and winds back around to sad. We forget, for a long second, that we’re watching a serial killer.
orphan black meets tumblr (inspired by)
singularnarrative:

stuckinabucket:

I keep seeing a lot of justifications for the “Peter Quill forgot he had a passenger” thing that boil down to “No, it’s a totally cool way to illustrate that the character’s an asshole!  You know, for character development!” and it’s just like…not really, people.
I mean, yes, that is a way that you can demonstrate a character is a total asshole.  (There are also other ways to demonstrate that same thing that doesn’t come off as an “lol fuck you” directed squarely at half your audience, but that’s a different argument.)  But the problem with that is that otherwise he doesn’t come off as the sort of asshole who’d do that sort of assholish thing.  He’s immature and dysfunctional and venal, yes.  But the first time we get any sort of character scene for him, he’s got a black eye from getting into a righteous-anger fight over a dead frog.  He’s surrounded by what appears to be a loving family in the throes of grief, from whom he’s summarily kidnapped by what turns out to be a gang of space-pirates.
He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life.  I don’t know if the repeated comments about eating him were meant to be taken absolutely at face value—there’s an argument to be made for reading them as some seriously fucked-up emotional blackmail rather than a genuine threat—but the dialogue about Yondu killing him if he gets out of line clearly isn’t a joke.  Whatever affection or use the pirates have for him, it’s explicitly not enough to keep him safe from them.  It’s not exactly an accident that the first instinct we see him showing almost every time there’s trouble is to try to smooth things over.
Rocket starts planning the escape from prison, and what happens? Groot straight-up rips something out of the fucking wall right in front of the guards.  Drax engages in some good old ultraviolence.  Gamora comes back with a device that was hardwired into somebody’s nervous system without batting an eye.  Peter…pays a guy a (judging by other sums mentioned) sizable chunk of money in exchange for the thing he needs.  Attempting to beat the dude up and take his stuff never even seems to occur to him.
He tries to talk everybody down when the other inmates are planning to murder Gamora.  He tries to talk everybody down when Rocket and Drax start fighting.  He’s the one who calls the Nova Corps to warn them instead of just showing up with what looks like an invasion fleet.  When Rocket pulls the “I need your prosthetic” thing again, Peter jumps in the middle and shuts it down like he’s apologizing for his racist grandma. 
He comes off like a guy who’s had to invest way too much energy, for way too long, into figuring out how everyone can go home happy and nobody needs to die today.  Like, how many times has he seen some variation on the psychic arrow vs. Kree soldiers scene play out with Yondu because he couldn’t defuse a situation?
Peter Quill isn’t supposed to be a huge asshole. (That would be Rocket, for those of you playing along at home.)  He’s supposed to be a fuck-up who’s figuring out that there can be more to his life than chasing the next thrill, pathologically flouting authority, and dodging his abusive foster-family.


"He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life."

Beautiful.

singularnarrative:

stuckinabucket:

I keep seeing a lot of justifications for the “Peter Quill forgot he had a passenger” thing that boil down to “No, it’s a totally cool way to illustrate that the character’s an asshole!  You know, for character development!” and it’s just like…not really, people.

I mean, yes, that is a way that you can demonstrate a character is a total asshole.  (There are also other ways to demonstrate that same thing that doesn’t come off as an “lol fuck you” directed squarely at half your audience, but that’s a different argument.)  But the problem with that is that otherwise he doesn’t come off as the sort of asshole who’d do that sort of assholish thing.  He’s immature and dysfunctional and venal, yes.  But the first time we get any sort of character scene for him, he’s got a black eye from getting into a righteous-anger fight over a dead frog.  He’s surrounded by what appears to be a loving family in the throes of grief, from whom he’s summarily kidnapped by what turns out to be a gang of space-pirates.

He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life.  I don’t know if the repeated comments about eating him were meant to be taken absolutely at face value—there’s an argument to be made for reading them as some seriously fucked-up emotional blackmail rather than a genuine threat—but the dialogue about Yondu killing him if he gets out of line clearly isn’t a joke.  Whatever affection or use the pirates have for him, it’s explicitly not enough to keep him safe from them.  It’s not exactly an accident that the first instinct we see him showing almost every time there’s trouble is to try to smooth things over.

Rocket starts planning the escape from prison, and what happens? Groot straight-up rips something out of the fucking wall right in front of the guards.  Drax engages in some good old ultraviolence.  Gamora comes back with a device that was hardwired into somebody’s nervous system without batting an eye.  Peter…pays a guy a (judging by other sums mentioned) sizable chunk of money in exchange for the thing he needs.  Attempting to beat the dude up and take his stuff never even seems to occur to him.

He tries to talk everybody down when the other inmates are planning to murder Gamora.  He tries to talk everybody down when Rocket and Drax start fighting.  He’s the one who calls the Nova Corps to warn them instead of just showing up with what looks like an invasion fleet.  When Rocket pulls the “I need your prosthetic” thing again, Peter jumps in the middle and shuts it down like he’s apologizing for his racist grandma. 

He comes off like a guy who’s had to invest way too much energy, for way too long, into figuring out how everyone can go home happy and nobody needs to die today.  Like, how many times has he seen some variation on the psychic arrow vs. Kree soldiers scene play out with Yondu because he couldn’t defuse a situation?

Peter Quill isn’t supposed to be a huge asshole. (That would be Rocket, for those of you playing along at home.)  He’s supposed to be a fuck-up who’s figuring out that there can be more to his life than chasing the next thrill, pathologically flouting authority, and dodging his abusive foster-family.

"He spends the rest of the film coming off like the sort of person who’s had to play The Functional One for the crew of the HMS Warp Factor Clusterfuck for over half his life." Beautiful.